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Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)
. >> the negotiation of some kind is necessary. >> whichever option you favor. this >> let me go northwest to syria. syria was discussed in the presidential campaign but the more it was discussed there and less difference there seemed to be between the two candidate. it came down to should we be arming the opposition? let me ask that question in a broader context? should we are mccumber opposition and whenever answer to that question is what is the strategic approach to the syrian conflict that preserves or protect american interests at this stage? >> let me begin and that end. the american international -- american position on foreign affairs was for in the aftermath of the second world war, the united states had a position of predominance that was unique in human history and transitory as other nations developed that degree of pre-eminence. at the same time the single most powerful country in the world, and the key to stupidity in many regions and the key to progress in many regions and when you say you are no longer preeminent you have to be able to establish priorities and when you establish pr
and syria. the whole house will be united in concern both at the intolerable situation for the residents of southern israel and the grave loss of life and humanitarian in gaza including the particular impact on children. on the 14th of november, the israeli defense forces began air strikein response to a sharp increase in rocket fire. hamas and other militant groups responded with other rocket fire. as of today, three israeli citizens have been killed and at least 109 palestinians including 33 women and 26 children -- 11 women and 26 children also lled. we have made clear that hamas have the principal responsibility for the start of the current crisis but also that all sides have responsibilities. we quickly called on israel to seek every opportunity to de escalate their militaryesponse and to observe international humanitarian law and avoid civilian casualties. yesterday e.u. foreign ministers condemned the rocket attacks on israel and called for an urgent cessation of hostilities. we have also warned that a ground invasion of gaza could length b the conflict, and erode international su
will prepare, considering, no, potentially success of the operation against the facility in syria. and that this may hold iran's restraints to acquire nuclear weapons. so we are in really concerned with situation, and let me add that people of iran will continue to suffer under very tough sanctions. so, there are two things which must change, diplomacy and inspections. first diplomacy. p5+1 has served as united front. five plus one means to me united nations, security council related, global responsibility to europeans like to prefer 3+3, which means the european union is the main player. i'm a little nervous about if you're in europe you had better say three plus the otherwise you will not be served dinner. [laughter] but i think it is, five plus one of course is important to keep on. but i think u.s. should not do, u.s. does not hide inside this group. u.s. has now time to take responsibility. and to change, to start with its relations with iran. isn't it time now, they give up on the occupation of the u.s. embassy in connection with islamic revolution of 1979. should also the i
peaceful protests. obviously the situation in syria has deteriorated since then. we have been engaged to help the opposition. we have committed to hundreds of millions of dollars of humanitarian aid to help folks both inside of syria and outside of syria. we are constantly consulting with the opposition on how they can get organized so that they're not splinters and divided in the face of the onslaught from the assaad regime. we are in very close contact with countries like turkey and jordan that immediately border syria and have an impact and obviously israel which is having already grave concerns as we do about, for example, movements of chemical weapons that might occur in such a chaotic atmosphere. and they could have an impact not just within syria but on the reas a whole. i'm encouraged to see that the syrian opposition created an umbrella group that may have more cohesion than they had in the past. we're going to be talking to them, my envoys are going to be traveling to various meetings taking place with the international community and the opposition. we consider them a legiti
joined him in applause. a pair of suicide car bombers in syria blew themselves up today in a suburb of damascus. at least 34 people were killed. the twin explosions shattered buildings and left streets littered with rubble. in addition to the dead, the state news agency reported dozens of people were wounded. meanwhile, in the north, rebels said they shot down a government fighter jet with an anti- aircraft missile. in egypt, the political crisis took a new turn, as two top appellate courts went on strike against president mohammed morsi. they said they won't return to work until morsi rescinds decrees giving himself near absolute power. at the same time, the supreme constitutional court rejected morsi's claims that it's undermining his government. >> ( translated ): the egyptian supreme constitutional court will not be terrorized from any threat or blackmail and it will not be subjected to any pressure from anyone, no matter how forcible the pressure. and the supreme constitutional court is ready to face this, whatever the consequences, which could be a high price, even if the pric
will be visiting the western battleground state of colorado later in this "journal." >> rebels in syria have reportedly killed 28 government soldiers. the rebels attacked three army checkpoints on the main road from damascus to aleppo. five rebels also died in the clashes. >> human rights groups are reporting government attacks in and around the syrian capital wednesday. it is thought this video shows a syrian army jet bombing a rebel area not far from the city. some positive unemployment numbers coming out of the united states five days ahead of the presidential election. payroll processing company adp says the u.s. economy added 150,000 jobs in october, the biggest gain since february. >> official figures from the government are to be released tomorrow. the unemployment rate in the u.s. remains just below 8%, much higher than before the onset of the financial crisis that in 2008. those job figures pushed stocks up on both sides of the atlantic on thursday. our correspondent sent us this round up. than any better than expected situation at the job market in the u.s. is a very good sign, not
continues to grow more powerful economically and politically. the civil war in syria is just one example of how beijing can exert its influence. they will also have to address domestic issues such as income disparity, environmental pollution, and corruption, to name just a few. on thursday, the party will unveil the new bureau and standing committee, the party's innermost during a power. that will complete the changing of the guard at the top until the next party congress. >> in business news, rwe has released quarterly results. germany's second largest power company has posted strong profits despite the slowdown in the eurozone. >> the biggest competitor eon shocked investors yesterday, but rwe is having no such problems. the company says it is having a good year, despite germany was a switch to more renewals and the debt crisis. in fact, rwe has raised its forecast for the year as a whole. >> for more, let's bring in our markets correspondent, who is standing by on the floor of the frankfurt stock exchange. how are investors reacting? >> the stock price of rwe is trading slightly lower
this period? and related to this, as we all know, there is a war -- a civil war happening in syria. iran is a wrote ally of the assad regime. how is that affecting iran yeas security calculations? -- iran's security calculations? are they going to insert that into the p-5 plus one dialogue? how will you answer the questions? >> of course the middle east has stranged. the syrian war and now this confrontation between israel and hamas that somehow brought us back to the middle east that we used to know, the israelis and the arabs going at it and egypt. but right before that iran saw its for turns decline. its popularity in the arab streets declined because of the arab spring, and then the syrian situation has introduced some very, very important elements, almost sectarian element that declined -- that eroded iranian influence in the region and the projection of the iranian power hit a brick wall with that. so all of this of course closed into the mix of what iran is thinking. and this is one of the reasons this is a good time to start negotiating with iran. as its reach in the middle east
of their rights eventually. >> thanks so much. to syria now. the country has gone offline. according to a firm that monitors global internet traffic, syrian public tv has claimed it is the work of terrorists, but activists speculate the syrian government is responsible. >> the civil conflict grinds on. this footage reportedly shows air strikes. outside damascus, rebels are reported to have blocked the road between the capital and its nearby airport. activists also said at least 10 people were killed in an air strike on a level. the body writing egypt's new constitution has been voting on the final draft. >> the assembly is signing off on that document bit by bit. they voted controversially to keep islamic law as the main source of legislation. most of the political opposition is boycotting the assembly. the document aims to transfer more power to egypt's parliament. critics say it is being rammed through too hastily. critics have already gathered where the president is expected to make an announcement. british lawmakers are looking at new ways to regulate the press. the calls for tougher guide
of the week. deadly fighting in syria reportedly left at least 63 people dead across the country tuesday, including 41 in the capital damascus. syrian tanks continue to shell the palestinian refugee camp which has seen heavy violence this month. france has become the first western country to recognize syria's newly brokered opposition coalition as the sole representative of the syrian people. the coalition was formed over the weekend at a summit in doma. at least 24 people at and killed and more than 100 wounded in a series of bombings across iraq. a multiple explosions were reported in at least four different areas, including baghdad and kirkuk. israel and palestinian leaders in gaza have agreed to attack -- agreed to a tacit truce following days of violence in the gaza strip. at least seven palestinians have been killed in israeli attacks on gaza since saturday. eight israeli civilians have also been wounded by palestinian rockets. the temporary ceasefire was brokered by the egyptian government, but both sides say they're prepared to resume attacks if it fails. the united nations gener
from syria where ten children are said to have been killed when a cluster bomb landed close to where they were playing. it's not the first alleged use of cluster units by the regime of president bashar al assad. it may be one of the most appalling. >> reporter: these disturbing images show what happens after a children's playground is hit, according to activist, by a cluster bomb. refugees with nowhere else to hide, apparently hit by a single deadly device dropped by a jet. some cluster bombs released smaller explosives to cause maximum devastation against softer targets. what do these children have to do with anything, yells one man? at least ten children killed, according to activist, who said they found the remains of the bomb around the tiny village of deir al assafir. cnn can't verify his pictures or claim that cluster bombs were used. but activist images from the scenes show cluster munitions. but activists say civilians have been hit before when the regime has responded to key rebel successes like at this important air base not far away. >> there is no logic at all attacking s
. >>> as the violence rages here in israel and gaza, peace is also hard to come by in nearby syria. but a major development today could help the rebels gain some ground. standby for that. and we'll have the latest on the secretary of state hillary clinton's push for peace. she's here in jerusalem right now. she's at the prime minister's office meeting with benjamin netanyahu. lots of breaking news happening right here. on gasoline. i am probably going to the gas station about once a month. last time i was at a gas station was about...i would say... two months ago. i very rarely put gas in my chevy volt. i go to the gas station such a small amount that i forget how to put gas in my car. [ male announcer ] and it's not just these owners giving the volt high praise. volt received the j.d. power and associates appeal award two years in a row. ♪ i heard you guys can ship ground for less than the ups store. that's right. i've learned the only way to get a holiday deal is to camp out. you know we've been open all night. is this a trick to get my spot? [ male announcer ] break from the holiday stress
have had a tense relationship since hamas supported the uprising in syria. what's that relationship and what's iran's role right now? >> absolutely. there are sectarian issues here. iran is predominantly shiite and hamas is predominantly sunni. the leader of hamas moved headquarters out of damascus and sided with the opposition. there is that real tension. in many ways, gaza reflects the kind of rivalry playing out in syria and elsewhere in the region. hamas relies on iran for military training and its most important weaponry, but there is this tension over syria. it's in syria's interest right now to see all the world's attention focused on gaza rather than on damascus to take some of the pressure off. these relationships in the region are shifting. part of what we're seeing, little gaza, it's important not just for what happens on israeli issues but the wider dynamics of the shifting sands across the middle east. >> let me ask you a question about what happens with hamas, depending how this plays out. there's one theory, dennis ross from the washington institute of near east polic
in just a few minutes time for more on that vote. the u.s. state department has con determined syria for launching another assault on its people. the communication shutdown comes as fighting forced today h damascus airport to close thursday night. is now the time for the international community to adopt a tougher stance this we're joined by madeleine albright, former u.s. secretary of state. madame secretary, thanks very much for joining us. >> good to be with you. thank you. >> we'd like to know straight away whether it's time now for the international community and especially the u.s. toed a don't a tou to adopt a tough every stance with regard to syria. >> i'm sure the international community and the united states are taking -- paying very close attention to what is going on and they have been taking pretty tough instances in terms of making clear support for this coalition of the rebel groups and also in terms of looking at what turkey needs and generally how to make clear that the international community believes that saddam hussein's -- sorry, that bashir assad's time is over.
to your broader question republicans will continue to respect and follow his advice and syria is the next big issue that he is pounding away on. he was at a forum at the newseum yesterday and crying out for american leadership on syria which means more involvement and there are a lot of big issues he has a huge influence on because of his experience, respect and personal history. this issue i'm not so sure they'll follow him on but two or three have said they're putting holds on a nomination. no bell laureate economists nominated for the federal reserve who was finally withdrew his name after a year of waiting because he was not going to be -- >> consumer. >> and the consumer protection service agency, elizabeth warren's former agency so you have people all over the place, judges -- >> ambassadors. >> when lindsey graham mentioned yesterday was john boughten and that was, okay, a warning because john was not confirmed for u.n. ambassador then was a recess appointee. no way the president will nominate a secretary of state as a recess appointee. you cannot with credible lead diplomacy over
pouring into syria as we speak, as well as libya, iraq, etc. >> greta: what did she say? >> she said, well, maybe i should have said core, that we have decimated core al-qaeda. well, first of all, that's a directly vastly different from what she actually said. number two is that really is kind of meaningless to take out core al-qaeda. but again, i want to emphasize many of these questions are right at the doorstep of the president of the united states. why did he on the 25th, two weeks later, talk to the united nations about hateful videos? why is he that he told "60 minutes" that he did not know what was the cause of the attack on benghazi when he claimed in the debate with mitt romney that he had called it a terrorist act at the white house, which he had not done so. he continued to go on various shows talking about hateful videos and not knowing -- >> greta: entertainment shows i might add. for the most part entertainment shows. all right. in terms of what she did tell you -- i saw a cbs reported that i posted on gretawire.com under the headline on who's on first, which can no one decid
'll read an excerpt from foreign policy. with the exception of syria she's won every major battle she's fought at u.n., imposes sanctions on north korea, sending a peacekeeping force, and warding off a full-scale war of sudan and south sudan. you're talking about qualifications for secretary of state, that qualifies her more than reading talking points. >> and at the beginning of this she was one of the few administration officials along with hillary clinton who pushed reluctant people inside the white house, including tom donnell lynn to interview in libya, a position senator republicans took at the time. >> human rights is a key issue and done a lot at u.n. with regard to women, disabled people. and i worked with her in the clinton administration. she was, you know, very tenacious. very intelligent woman. very strong willed. i guess one of the things, as a woman i don't like, some of the criticism of her, if this was a man, it -- these would be positive attributes. >> exactly. >> as a woman, well you know she's feisty. >> or they -- when mccain said she's not very brought, this is s
, the conflict would probably be spreading to syria, creating one large issue. withdrawing from the western part of afghanistan. it would be disruptive of the security of oil flowing through the strait of hormuz. and there is a further uncertainty involved in that kind of an operation common namely how successful would be, in fact. and estimates regarding israel's potential to be decisively effective and estimates depend on the scale of the american attack. even a relatively modest attack by the united states would inflict serious casualties when the ratings for this for precipitation of the spirit are still unknown factors of what happens. there will be a significant factor of human casualties, particularly in places that are larger than some facilities, that have been destroyed or relocated. all of that makes an attack not a very attractive remedy for dealing with the problem. a problem which then would pale with significance compared to the consequences of the attack once the dynamic concept was set in motion. so i dismiss that serious alternative. i think it would be an act of utter irrespon
in on some of the same elements of the bar gain. jon: let's turn our attention to syria. the bloodshed goes on there, some would say that it has been, i mean, that world attention has been focused on what's been going on between hamas and the israelis, maybe the egyptian protests while the syrians continue to kill their own people with the support of iran. what do you think? >> yeah, i mean, look, you know, it's coming up now on two years since relatively peaceful demonstrations turned into, essentially, a civil war. and the reality is there has been so much blood that has been spilled, that it's going to negate the possibility of a negotiated settlement between the assads and the opposition and, tragically, not enough blood has been spilled in order to prompt a divided international community, and the administration is very warily -- i would argue rightly, frankly -- about getting dragged into an open-ended military intervention ford to topple the assads. maybe there's a few more things we can do. arming some of the rebels that we vet, maybe considering up a sort of passive no-fly zone wit
in the worth the misery of refugees in the 60 years in camps in lebanon and syria and the people of gaza by the israeli blockade in the west bank occupation. so why is it that he makes a statement today, which in effect says the u.s. and israel's diplomatic object is our holding a veto over our vote at the u.n. tomorrow? canal from the side of history not talk about them though for unconditional recognition of palestine? >> i don't think i was talking about the hand of history. cozy tony blair phrase. most mac but i go back to this point that we need a negotiation. he asked why the opinions of israel and the united states matter so much. that's because we will only help alleviate the problem and hope decisively those people with the negotiated settlement with israel. that means of course one has to allow for opinion in israel as well, which is the nation in the world that has the closest relationships with israel, the biggest leverage of the foreign policy decisions and the united states and that is why we have to have new regard for their opinion as well. that is the practical and diplo
Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)